Professor Lim Seng Gee

Professor Lim Seng Gee
Lead Principal Investigator, Singapore Hepatitis B Consortium & Senior Consultant

MBBS (Hons Monash), FRACP, MD (Monash), FAMS, Cert Immunology (King’s College)
Professor of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore
Director of Hepatology Services, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, NUH
Professor, Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore
Director of Hepatology services, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, NUHExpert panel member, Centre for Drug Administration (CPA) and Centre for Drug Evaluation (CDE), Ministry of Health, Singapore
Chairman, Singapore Hepatitis Conference (annual), inaugural conference 2014

 

His main clinical work focuses on the treatment of viral hepatitis (esp. B and C), liver disease and liver cancer. Prof Lim’s research activities include leadership in Hepatology research, which focuses on improving treatment for chronic hepatitis B and C, pathophysiology of hepatitis B disease, HBV virology, immunological mechanisms of HBeAg seroconversion, and loss of immune tolerance to hepatitis B virus. He also has an interest in pathophysiology and treatment of liver cancer, primary hepatocyte culture, hepatocyte function, drug related liver disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Prof Lim has over 100 publications in peer review journals and sits on the editorial board of Liver International and GastroHep.com. He has received over S$5 million in research grants and is a reviewer for Singapore’s grant funding agencies and the American Association for Liver Disease Annual Meeting.

Prof Lim also sits on the Advisory Board of Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Idenix Pharmaceuticals, Bristol Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals and is on the Speaker’s Bureau for GlaxoSmithKline and Schering Plough Pharmaceuticals. Prof Lim has been an invited speaker at AASLD, EASL and APASL in 2013, 2014 and is a regular speaker at numerous International and Regional meetings on liver disease and viral hepatitis